The insurmountable problems of parallel legal systems

By LSS member Daniel Anderson

The attempts to establish parallel legal systems can in fact be seen as a project to transfer legal rights away from people and to groups instead.

Certain groups, usually based on a culture or religion, are deemed by proponents of parallel legal systems as worthy of having their own separate legal rights, and so parallel legal systems are consequently proposed to make this a reality.

But this attempt to transfer legal rights to groups causes problems that the advocates of parallel legal systems can only fail to address. Below are some of these problems.

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“Islamophobia”: an absurd term

PhobiasBy LSS member Jay Marshall

Islam: A monotheistic and Abrahamic religion articulated by the Qur’an and considered by many of its adherents to be the verbatim word of Allah; it is also comprised of prophetic traditions (or Hadith) of Muhammad (c. 570–8 June 632 CE), considered by most Muslims to be the last prophet of God.

Phobia: An extremely irrational fear or dislike of something.

I lay out these definitions for my reader so that they may understand the surrounding context of what I will now attempt to articulate.

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The Muslim Arbitration Tribunal: an exercise in “Legalwash”

Legalwash

By LSS member Daniel Anderson

I think we have all heard of the terms Whitewash and Greenwash.

Whitewash: A deliberate attempt to conceal unpleasant or incriminating facts about a person or organisation in order to protect their reputation.

Greenwash: Disinformation disseminated by an organisation so as to present an environmentally responsible public image.

(Source: Oxford Dictionary)

 I now wish to introduce to you a new term which I claim to have coined: Legalwash.

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The Arbitration Act 1996: does it allow religious tribunals to make rulings that can be enforced by the civil courts?

By LSS member Daniel Anderson

“We realised that under the Arbitration Act we can make rulings which can be enforced by county and high courts. The Act allows disputes to be resolved using alternatives like tribunals. This method is called alternative dispute resolution, which for Muslims is what the sharia courts are.”

 Sheikh Faiz-ul-Aqtab Siddiqi, founder of the Muslim Arbitration Tribunal Panels

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